The Astor Place Riot occurred on May 10, 1849 at the now-demolished Astor Opera House  in Manhattan, New York City and left at least 25 dead and more than 120 injured.  It was the deadliest to that date of a number of civic disturbances in New York City which generally pitted immigrants and nativists against each other, or together against the upper classes who controlled the city's police and the state militia. The riot marked the first time a state militia had been called out and had shot into a crowd of citizens, and it led to the creation of the first police force armed with deadly weapons, yet its genesis was a dispute between Edwin Forrest, one of the best-known American actors of that time, and William Charles Macready, a similarly notable English actor, which largely revolved around which of them was better than the other at acting the major roles of Shakespeare. by@wikis

The Astor Place Riot occurred on May 10, 1849 at the now-demolished Astor Opera House  in Manhattan, New York City and left at least 25 dead and more than 120 injured.  It was the deadliest to that date of a number of civic disturbances in New York City which generally pitted immigrants and nativists against each other, or together against the upper classes who controlled the city's police and the state militia.

The riot marked the first time a state militia had been called out and had shot into a crowd of citizens, and it led to the creation of the first police force armed with deadly weapons, yet its genesis was a dispute between Edwin Forrest, one of the best-known American actors of that time, and William Charles Macready, a similarly notable English actor, which largely revolved around which of them was better than the other at acting the major roles of Shakespeare. by@wikis

Astor Place Barber Shop.( dowstairs )    “Astor Barber All-stars” It’s where Bruce Willis once asked a stylist to tweeze his ears, the long-haired hippies of the 1960s almost drove business to a halt, and a sign on the front desk announces: “We speak Italian Russian Greek Spanish French Polish.” Since 1939, Astor Place Hairstylists has been a fixture of Manhattan’s West Village. In its heyday, the barbershop boasted multiple floors and was so crowded that customers were herded over a microphone. Today, the family-owned business is still bustling along to the breakneck pace of a New York minute. “Astor Barber All-stars” introduces us to Astor Place, where 30-plus barbers serve up haircuts starting at $16 and use straight razors to etch meticulous lineups, tapers and designs. An enduring New York landmark, Astor Place has thrived for nearly 75 years and remains one of the last barbershops of its kind, a mom-and-pop establishment where the occasional fist fight is unavoidable and payment is always cash-only. Jessica, a stylist, offers the following by way of explanation: “We’re not fancy, but our work is.” Filmmaker Karen Gehres’ no-frills documentary isn’t fancy, either. Instead, her approach is a straightforward one. Gehre weaves archival footage and contemporary interviews with stylists and clients into a comprehensive profile of the iconic and much-beloved barbershop. With unassuming sincerity, Gehre captures the legacy of Astor Place as it always has been and continues to be: that of a cultural institution where the clients are loyal, the music is loud and old-fashioned artistry still reigns supreme. -Sarah Adler / from the Californians 

Astor Place Barber Shop.( dowstairs )

 

 “Astor Barber All-stars

It’s where Bruce Willis once asked a stylist to tweeze his ears, the long-haired hippies of the 1960s almost drove business to a halt, and a sign on the front desk announces: “We speak Italian Russian Greek Spanish French Polish.”

Since 1939, Astor Place Hairstylists has been a fixture of Manhattan’s West Village. In its heyday, the barbershop boasted multiple floors and was so crowded that customers were herded over a microphone. Today, the family-owned business is still bustling along to the breakneck pace of a New York minute.

“Astor Barber All-stars” introduces us to Astor Place, where 30-plus barbers serve up haircuts starting at $16 and use straight razors to etch meticulous lineups, tapers and designs. An enduring New York landmark, Astor Place has thrived for nearly 75 years and remains one of the last barbershops of its kind, a mom-and-pop establishment where the occasional fist fight is unavoidable and payment is always cash-only. Jessica, a stylist, offers the following by way of explanation: “We’re not fancy, but our work is.”

Filmmaker Karen Gehres’ no-frills documentary isn’t fancy, either. Instead, her approach is a straightforward one. Gehre weaves archival footage and contemporary interviews with stylists and clients into a comprehensive profile of the iconic and much-beloved barbershop. With unassuming sincerity, Gehre captures the legacy of Astor Place as it always has been and continues to be: that of a cultural institution where the clients are loyal, the music is loud and old-fashioned artistry still reigns supreme.

-Sarah Adler / from the Californians 

Waiting Lines For Haircuts 

Waiting Lines For Haircuts 

 

...Back in 1987, I found my self in NY city where I've got my first job at the world famous Hair Salon ASTOR HAIR  in the middle of the Village and that was the place to be! 

 I was glad to move into Manhattan and out of Newark/NJ.  At the beginning, I couldn't understand why they gave a hard time at that hair salon in Newark NJ.  My boss couldn't  give me a real reason why he ask me to find another job and he actually said  that I need to move to Manhattan.

Fashion Show / Astor Place 

Fashion Show / Astor Place 

He said something about I couldn't make that kind of money there in NJ, Till today I wonder what he meant to say...  Then I realize that I couldn't make more money then him, who was the owner.... When I came to Newark from Rio/Brazil I spoke Portuguese, and that was perfect because most  clients were Portuguese and Brazilian and I guess they like my hair styles and colors techniques... 

Fashion Show Asror Place 

Fashion Show Asror Place 

Working in the NYC hair salon floor gave me the best experience in the world... it's been simply amazing!  

Back In the 80's, nobody had the multitude of clients like Astor Hair, their perfect location near New York University, shopping, clubs, bars... Everything and Everyone came to this tourist area. Village & college kids and their mothers came to get their hair cut, style and also to have fun... 

In order to work there you had to be licensed and an awesome Hair Stylist/ Professional Barber or completely crazy.

   One day I came to work a bit earlier, and this British hairstylist gave me a cup of coffee... I gladly took as a sweet gesture... But nothing was sweet about that coffee...  That Brit was a fluke of a hairdresser and he gave me a coffee laced with acid:

I tripped all day thinking I gone crazy and I cut and style hair all day long...  I thought I was gonna pass out when I approached the manager Paul and told him There I was feeling weird and I tasted acid in my mouth .... That was the crazy Memorial Day weekend ... One of the busiest holidays of the year!  I used to love Astor Place and 

it was part of my life, Mr Eurico, Paul,  and many other fellow coworkers some of them no longer with us... Miss you guys miss that time...

ps:

I hate to take an acid without knowing.

I survived.                   

George Alan  

 

 ASTOR PLACE      

                DOCUMENTARY

   Astor Hair / Good Times Gone By

   Astor Hair / Good Times Gone By

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